Navy Chair2017-12-07T16:40:23-04:00

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Navy Chair

The Navy Chair was introduced in 1944 for submarines and navy ships during World War II. It was designed to be indestructible with a guaranteed lifespan of 150 years.

DESIGNER | Wilton Dinges, 1944

Navy Chair

H: 34″
W: 16″
D: 19.5″

The Navy Chair was introduced in 1944 for submarines and navy ships during World War II. It was designed to be indestructible with a guaranteed lifespan of 150 years. The manufacturer’s 77-step proprietary metal processing yielded aluminum three times stronger than steel, creating a lightweight chair that would withstand heavy use, rust, fire, and battle conditions. When military demand slowed following the Cold War, production of the chair was almost stopped. Forward-thinking designers like Philippe Starck have given the iconic chair a boost. Highly collectible, the Navy Chair and its many duplicates are in use in commercial, residential and collegiate interiors around the world, including nearly every law enforcement program on television, such as the “NCIS” franchise.

Wilton C. Dinges

Wilton C. Dinges (1915-1974), entrepreneur and inventor, was a master tool and die maker with an engineering background and a love of sculpture, especially the work of Rodin. In 1944, with $300 in savings and a used lathe, the 28-year-old entrepreneur and inventor launched his own company–Emeco (Electric Machine Equipment Company) and started bidding on government manufacturing contracts.

Navy Chair  | c.1944

Manufacturer

Original: Emeco | USA
Current: Emeco | USA

Build

Dimensions: 16″W x 19.5″D x 34″H
Material: aluminium